[Guest Post] How to Get Your Art Noticed

Photo Credit: Eddy Klaus via Unsplash under License

Getting Started

The art business is notoriously tough to break into. Getting your art noticed by art galleries, potential employers and art enthusiasts requires a lot of hard work, the right platforms and persistence. Building up your portfolio, creating a strong social media strategy and online art presence, and making connections are the key steps to gaining recognition for your art.

 

Harness Social Media

These days, social media is one of the most effective ways to get your name out in the world as an artist. The right social media strategy can make all the difference in how many people view and share your artwork. Pinterest, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook are all excellent tools for promoting art.

Think carefully about the content you post. You need to give people a reason to follow you in the first place. Post content that you don’t have on your blog or website, like beginning sketches or the first stages of home sculptures and home paintings. Works in progress are a great way to let fans see your artistic process.

But posting good content isn’t the only part of a good social media strategy. Interaction is key. If you want to gain followers, you need to actually get involved in the online art community. Follow accounts similar to yours, leave comments and ‘likes’, and you may find yourself gaining much more followers. It’s also a good idea to join online communities exclusively devoted to posting art online and connecting with other artists. DeviantArt – the largest online social community for art enthusiasts and artists – is a prominent example.

 

Build Your Portfolio

Every artist should have a media kit with a portfolio. If you want your artwork noticed by the curators of art galleries, you need to build up a substantial and impressive body of work. Without it, there is not much chance you will be taken seriously.

As most artists know, the art world is very competitive and you must stand out to be noticed. Your media kit should accurately represent who you are as an artist, and should include a portfolio of your artwork, an artist statement, a brief biography, your press releases, published articles, and an artist business card and brochure.

Photo Credit: NeONBRAND via Unsplash under License

 

Interior Design

Targeting the art gallery market is not the only way to go. There are other ways to sell your art and get exposure. The interior design market is a great example of a massive industry that is always in need of new art. Interior designers are constantly in need for home paintings and home sculptures.

Before approaching designers, do research to make sure their work is in sync with your own, then put together a wide array of pieces for them to choose from. If they find the piece they’re looking for, they won’t mind if you lack experience and training.

Interiorart designers often hang around studio tours, art shows and art galleries – from where you can also gain inspiration. Remember, connection and interaction is essential to getting noticed in the art world. Going out to these places is a great way to meet potential interior designers, employers, art lovers and other artists.

 

Harper is an Auckland-based freelance writer who loves discussing home and lifestyle topics. She has enjoyed the privilege of writing content for local businesses such as Sea Containers. Harper keeps her home simple by choosing minimalistic décor and design. You can find more of her written work on her Tumblr page: Harper Reid.

 

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[Survey] Help Designers Improve

I often wonder, as a designer, if I am offering what people want/need. I am certain there are many things I can improve or change but people are not telling me. I can easily find reasons why people should hire designers. But I can’t find why people prefer not to work with designers.

What if residential designers can learn what homeowners, industry partners and contractors want? Sure this won’t bring world peace. But it will minimize unnecessary frustrations of all parties involved in a design project. We will make the profession better. Please help and fill out the survey to share your opinions. You have the option to be anonymous. After I have collected enough responses and organized them, I will share the results in a blog article. Please share this SURVEY with those who may be interested in contributing.

Thank you in advance for helping out!

CAD Myths Clarified

Being a formally educated designer and having been providing architectural/construction drafting services to design professionals for over a decade, I find most people, even professionals in the industry, are not clear about CAD (Computer Aided Drafting).
CAD is the way to design.
CAD is a production and communication tool, not a design tool.
CAD is faster.
CAD does produce clean and accurate documents and can be efficient in revisions. But the quality depends on the person using the program.
Manual Drafting and Sketching are outdated.
Manual drafting and sketching are activities directly connected to our brains. Studies show students taking notes by hand in class generally do better compared to students taking notes with their laptops.
In general, people don’t respect the profession of CAD drafting. Even drafters don’t have pride in this line of work. Good CAD drafters are not just computer program operators. They are an essential part of every successful projects. A drafter, CAD or manual, must understand design and construction and how things ae made.
After getting my B.A. in Art with emphasis in interior design and a few year of work experience, I spent 2 semesters (30 hours per week for 40 weeks) to complete the CAD certification program. With the skilled I learned, I was able to work with architects and designers on high-end projects and gain experience. I have invested a lot of time and effort. I get asked often, but I really don’t know how to learn CAD in a short time.
CAD programs does offer many advantages. BIM (Building Information Modeling) and other 3D programs enable us to study the design closely and communicate effectively with the entire team. But what we have neglected is continue to strengthen our fundamental skills such as simply using pencil and paper.

Social Media can be Fun

A few years back, part of my deal was helping designers with social media. I started experiencing all different platforms. Social Media had changed a lot. Many designers are frustrated as it takes time and doesn’t bring any business. The thing is, most of the marketing specialists are not interior designers. Social Media is a great way to reach to many people with very little cost. But interior designers just need a handful of great projects (and a dozen of OK ones) each year. Many of us is are one-person studios and struggle to find time for social media.
Social Media is a branding tool for us creative minds. I use social media to present myself in a certain way hoping to attract people who share the same values and interests. It’s hard to showcase on my business website that besides being a professional designer with the required qualification, I am also a classical musician, a bookworm (still challenged with English), a tea seller, an artist, a home cook, and a makeup addict. All the non-design related qualities set me apart from other designers. My suggestion is don’t worry about what others say you should or shouldn’t do. Have fun with social media! It’s fine to do things different. One of my clients found me on Houzz because I posted plans while no other local professionals did. Think about who we like to follow on social media. We follow people/businesses that enjoy what they do, offer good information, and match our values.

Happy Valentine’s Day

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